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  • Oh yeah. Here's another tip.

    The default Gen4 eyes don't have the cornea bulging out. So, I recommend fiddling with the morphs a bit. They can alter the specular highlights of the eyes, be it on the cornea or the eyesurface.

    Here's a render with the default settings.

    And here's a render with the Eyes Cornea Bulge set to 70% and Eyes Iris Convexity to -100%.

    Same materials, same textures. As you can see, there's a noticeable difference there. I think it's more accurate since the cornea does bulges out a bit in reality.



  • Well, there's no IOR value in DS for reflections/speculars, just strength and blur. I got those results through a process of trial and error. From experience though, I would say it's almost skin like. I generally avoid having too high reflection on the sclera, since they tend to reflect the nose. You could set it higher on the cornea though.

    Found this link - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_refractive_indices

    There's an IOR value for human cornea there. Roughly translated, I'd say my settings is on the high side (about 1.6, I think).



  • @'hzr':

    http://www.cgfeedback.com/cgfeedback/showthread.php?t=263

    Check through this one, you should find some good examples in there.

    Thanks for bringing that up btw, I hadnt bothered alot with eye shaders until now and used this to build me a decent setup.

    This is basically an adaptation of the settings which AdamLewis used, he also posted his setup as a max scene there.

    If you want for an awesome look you should also activate dispersion inside the cornea, but it adds A TON of render time and only really making a difference in those facial closeups.

    edit : quick render with a figure

    Also, a very quick and easy tip to get your eyes to shine a little nicer in post. Create a Brightness/Contrast Adjustment layer, invert it so the layer itself is pure black. Then set the brightness of it to something you can notice well, like 50 or so. Then use a pure white brush with a size that enables you to paint inside the iris of your characters eye. Paint over the iris to raise the brightness of it. After you got that done you can just easily adjust the brightness and contrast of the most interesting part of the eye and get the look you want. Take all but a few seconds to set up but the results can be awesome.

    Thanks for your input, I will definietly keep all of that in mind when I'm working with Genesis again :D
    The eyes look awesome!

    @'matthacker':

    My 2 cents.

    There's also two other things to consider: the figure and the texture. Gen4 have that eyesurface material enveloping most of the eyeballs while Genesis doesn't. Textures also have different shades for the sclera, some baked beyond repair.

    Generally, I setup the eyesurface materials to capture specular highlights only, opacity set to 20% without any transparent textures as masks. You could probably add a bump map to it as well. All reflections is done in the cornea (with opacity set to 40% - twice the eyesurface, without any masks as well) and sclera. I set the reflection strength to be very low (30%) without any blur, just enough to give the eyes some hint of reflected areas. Since I'm not using any masks, I setup the specular and reflection to not account for opacity settings and control the strength via the their respective strength dials alone.

    Here's my render.

    I admit, it's not the most realistic looking settings, but most of the visual cues are present. I haven't succeded in adding more wetness to the eyesurface and just recently worked on the lacrimals.

    The eyes look good imo, but there's one thing I have to ask about the reflections: what value did u set to IOR of cornea and sclera materials?
    Big thanks for your input! :)



  • My 2 cents.

    There's also two other things to consider: the figure and the texture. Gen4 have that eyesurface material enveloping most of the eyeballs while Genesis doesn't. Textures also have different shades for the sclera, some baked beyond repair.

    Generally, I setup the eyesurface materials to capture specular highlights only, opacity set to 20% without any transparent textures as masks. You could probably add a bump map to it as well. All reflections is done in the cornea (with opacity set to 40% - twice the eyesurface, without any masks as well) and sclera. I set the reflection strength to be very low (30%) without any blur, just enough to give the eyes some hint of reflected areas. Since I'm not using any masks, I setup the specular and reflection to not account for opacity settings and control the strength via the their respective strength dials alone.

    Here's my render.

    I admit, it's not the most realistic looking settings, but most of the visual cues are present. I haven't succeded in adding more wetness to the eyesurface and just recently worked on the lacrimals.



  • http://www.cgfeedback.com/cgfeedback/showthread.php?t=263

    Check through this one, you should find some good examples in there.

    Thanks for bringing that up btw, I hadnt bothered alot with eye shaders until now and used this to build me a decent setup.

    This is basically an adaptation of the settings which AdamLewis used, he also posted his setup as a max scene there.

    If you want for an awesome look you should also activate dispersion inside the cornea, but it adds A TON of render time and only really making a difference in those facial closeups.

    edit : quick render with a figure

    Also, a very quick and easy tip to get your eyes to shine a little nicer in post. Create a Brightness/Contrast Adjustment layer, invert it so the layer itself is pure black. Then set the brightness of it to something you can notice well, like 50 or so. Then use a pure white brush with a size that enables you to paint inside the iris of your characters eye. Paint over the iris to raise the brightness of it. After you got that done you can just easily adjust the brightness and contrast of the most interesting part of the eye and get the look you want. Take all but a few seconds to set up but the results can be awesome.


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