Business School in Hyderabad



  • In finance, the term “B-School” is a shorthand term that refers to schools that specialize in business subjects. B-Schools are known for their highly competitive admission standards, with the most sought-after schools regularly rejecting over 90% of applicants. IMT Hyderabad is one of the best Business School in Hyderabad. These schools have also been the subject of debate in recent years because of their substantial financial costs. B-Schools are similar to other post-secondary higher education institutions, except that they are focused on subject areas related to business and finance. Common examples include accounting, finance, marketing, and entrepreneurship. In some cases, schools will offer specialized programs in less common areas of study, such as actuarial sciences or taxation law. As with other institutions, various rankings exist which aim to help students assess the quality and prestige associated with specific schools. These include rankings published by The Financial Times, The Economist, and BusinessWeek, among others.



  • Definitely one of my weaknesses is not planning out exactly how long the image set is. Usually I end up with around 40 - 60 images in a set and that's even without a written story. So in these cases it can be a bit daunting for me to realize that I'm about 30 images into a set and there hasn't been sex yet just build up which means a lot more work until it's finished. You need the build up but the zombie set I'm working has way too much I think.

    Another thing that gets me down is coming up with a great idea but then not being able to recreate or find the environment or characters I had in mind. Then if you just say "well anything will do" then you end up losing interest and wanting to work on something else.

    So like I said in my above post I find the best thing is to have 2 or even 3 different projects going at once so you can switch between them when you start loosing interest in the other. Because It really shows when an artist has lost interest in the scene.



  • @'stoper':

    Can't talk from experience, because I have no experience in the area.
    But I guess the key is to make only what you like. If you feel like making a long, time consuming, story - make it. If you're doing it only because people may like it, then I can see how it can start dragging at some point.
    And I guess the best situation is if you write the whole story/plot, before starting to make the renders. Write the whole stuff, read it, see if it still excites you, and then fire the render engine.
    If you're starting a whole sci-fi story, just because you had a good idea about a sex scene between a girl and a robot, you may feel dry after making that certain scene. In these cases, better make an image series or something.

    Some great advice right here, Stoper. I thought doing commissions would be fun but working on other people's ideas that weren't very exciting to me just became a drag, really just like a job instead of something fun. It's also easy for me to get bored in the middle of a big set and either not finish or my work becomes half-assed just so I can get it out of the way. My strategy now is to plan a set to be fairly small, and plan specifically what the scenes will be instead of figuring out as I go along. If I feel like I want to add more later I can always do that.



  • @'stoper':

    Can't talk from experience, because I have no experience in the area.
    But I guess the key is to make only what you like. If you feel like making a long, time consuming, story - make it. If you're doing it only because people may like it, then I can see how it can start dragging at some point.
    And I guess the best situation is if you write the whole story/plot, before starting to make the renders. Write the whole stuff, read it, see if it still excites you, and then fire the render engine.
    If you're starting a whole sci-fi story, just because you had a good idea about a sex scene between a girl and a robot, you may feel dry after making that certain scene. In these cases, better make an image series or something.

    Thank you, Stoper.

    I actually storyboarded and wrote out all 4 chapters of Ruins of Eldahar (©). I think I just stretched beyond my capabilities on that one. Once I finish my current projects and commissions, I think I will revisit it again.



  • Can't talk from experience, because I have no experience in the area.
    But I guess the key is to make only what you like. If you feel like making a long, time consuming, story - make it. If you're doing it only because people may like it, then I can see how it can start dragging at some point.
    And I guess the best situation is if you write the whole story/plot, before starting to make the renders. Write the whole stuff, read it, see if it still excites you, and then fire the render engine.
    If you're starting a whole sci-fi story, just because you had a good idea about a sex scene between a girl and a robot, you may feel dry after making that certain scene. In these cases, better make an image series or something.



  • Ok, I think this thread has been seriously hijacked now. Supro, you can lock it if you want.



  • @'miro':

    Ermm… are you saying South Park is trying to compete with Pixar on visuals? The fact that they can complete a show in a week obviously indicates that their art style isn't that sophisticated, even though I'm sure their budget allows for a sophisticated process. But I doubt even they themselves are going to say South Park is the epitome of art.

    That doesn't mean their art style isn't valid, of course it's valid and perfectly suited to their humor. I guess, what I'm trying to say is hyper realistic and HD quality art is not the only way to go, but it is the obvious route.

    @'Supro':

    I didn't say it was like Pixar, but the show is very advanced. The animation style does make it easier, but it's still a huge accomplishment to complete an animated show within a week (script writing and all) using Maya. If you're expecting a fully CGI Dreamworks or Pixar style show, then yeah. It's not as sophisticated. But the show is anything less than impressive.

    I think this is an example of comparing apples and oranges. Obviously both studios have different goals and targets - one a full-length feature and another a series of episodes. Even if budget and processing power are unlimited, time will be. Just look at any 3d animation series - most of them employed a lot of hacks and shortcuts to manage render times.

    I don't think I've ever seen a 3d animated series with as much detail as Pixar shorts or Avatar. But then again, they don't have too. Even if render times cease to be a factor, you don't always go with the 'realistic' looking style. Sometimes a more stylistic approach is better. For me, it's a fallacy to think everything and everyone should target a photorealistic render. Art, even artistic porn (be it 2D or 3D) is a free form of expression, so it can take on any shapes and styles.



  • @'miro':

    @'Supro':

    Don't you be talkin' bad about South Park. The people working on that show are miracle workers as they can make an episode in a week (writing, sound and animated) compared to other animated shows that take about 3 months. There's also the fact that they use Maya, a 3D based program, to create that 2D look. And you know how much of a bitch it is to create a quality 2D product in 3D.

    In other words, the show's style is a lot more advanced than you would think.

    Ermm… are you saying South Park is trying to compete with Pixar on visuals? The fact that they can complete a show in a week obviously indicates that their art style isn't that sophisticated, even though I'm sure their budget allows for a sophisticated process. But I doubt even they themselves are going to say South Park is the epitome of art.

    That doesn't mean their art style isn't valid, of course it's valid and perfectly suited to their humor. I guess, what I'm trying to say is hyper realistic and HD quality art is not the only way to go, but it is the obvious route.

    I didn't say it was like Pixar, but the show is very advanced. The animation style does make it easier, but it's still a huge accomplishment to complete an animated show within a week (script writing and all) using Maya. If you're expecting a fully CGI Dreamworks or Pixar style show, then yeah. It's not as sophisticated. But the show is anything less than impressive.



  • I can hardly talk having only really just started rendering last year. But I usually find It's best to have about 2 projects going at the same time to avoid getting bored of one.

    My image sets hardly qualify as stories but I try to plan out the series of events that happen, but usually I just have a rough idea of what position to use or what state of mind the characters are in at that particular time. But most of it comes down to what looks good on the fly. And I always try to keep post work to a minimum but I usually find there's a bit of clean up to do here and there.

    I think sometimes in 3dx unless you're a good writer its hard to keep dialogue fresh not just within your series but in comparison to all the other artists. After all there are only so many phrases that can be said during a particular type of sex scene. The words and scenario may change but the dialogue usually implies the same thing as the other comics of that genre do.


  • administrators

    @'Supro':

    Don't you be talkin' bad about South Park. The people working on that show are miracle workers as they can make an episode in a week (writing, sound and animated) compared to other animated shows that take about 3 months. There's also the fact that they use Maya, a 3D based program, to create that 2D look. And you know how much of a bitch it is to create a quality 2D product in 3D.

    In other words, the show's style is a lot more advanced than you would think.

    Ermm… are you saying South Park is trying to compete with Pixar on visuals? The fact that they can complete a show in a week obviously indicates that their art style isn't that sophisticated, even though I'm sure their budget allows for a sophisticated process. But I doubt even they themselves are going to say South Park is the epitome of art.

    That doesn't mean their art style isn't valid, of course it's valid and perfectly suited to their humor. I guess, what I'm trying to say is hyper realistic and HD quality art is not the only way to go, but it is the obvious route.



  • Oh, the work gets done, just not as fast as I would like. Other projects get in the way, other ideas come to mind, etc.

    The wife and I had a long talk and I will be starting Third Hammer Studios this year. Go me!



  • I'm not an artist, but in terms of keeping motivated to finish a set, I think you need to just accept the fact that if you don't do it, it's not going to get done. (just like your workouts)

    If I read your thread correctly, you've basically got the comic "storyboarded" and now have to actually create the pics?

    If so just open poser/daz and start doing the work :)



  • @'miro':

    1. regardless of what you pick your production standards will likely have to be very high, 3DX is a visual medium and unless you come up with a south park type of theme people are going to want to see high quality graphics, much better than the average poser/ daz render

    Don't you be talkin' bad about South Park. The people working on that show are miracle workers as they can make an episode in a week (writing, sound and animated) compared to other animated shows that take about 3 months. There's also the fact that they use Maya, a 3D based program, to create that 2D look. And you know how much of a bitch it is to create a quality 2D product in 3D.

    In other words, the show's style is a lot more advanced than you would think.


  • administrators

    One method is you tell yourself to get it done in 2 weeks, and after the 2 weeks end you're just 2 pages in you give yourself another 2 weeks and before you know it i turns into 4 months :D A form of self hypnosis, haha

    As for getting fans/ comments, IMO the best way is:

    1. you must really love what you do, there's no way you can maintain a work load as complex as 3DX without huge passion, I also think you can never deliver your best work otherwise
    2. from here there two ways, either you pick your niche like monster sex, dick girls, big boobs, etc and become the best or at least one of the top in the field or you pick something unique maybe a unique story line, a unique art style, a specific fetish that few are doing but has broad potential appeal - the people have to look at your work and immediately see that it's you or at least that it's something different and special
    3. regardless of what you pick your production standards will likely have to be very high, 3DX is a visual medium and unless you come up with a south park type of theme people are going to want to see high quality graphics, much better than the average poser/ daz render

    The above is just my opinion though.



  • @'jbtrimar':

    Thanks Bobby. I do wish I could hear more from that audience though. A lot of the other artists I follow and admire seem to have more active folks following them. Mine seem to be…quiet :)

    I hear you on that, I live for comments on my work but they seem to be fewer than I would like. I try to figure out what it is about some of the other artists that gets comments, and improve my work while making something I actually want to make. Also I've been trying to take the time to comment more on other artists' work as I know they appreciate it as well.

    About the thread topic, I've also found myself getting burnt out easily especially when things don't turn out how I want right away. I've started trying to aim for smaller projects at a time but it's about balancing because I hate to only get one render out of one scene.



  • Thanks Bobby. I do wish I could hear more from that audience though. A lot of the other artists I follow and admire seem to have more active folks following them. Mine seem to be…quiet :)



  • I think all creative endeavors risk a bit of burnout.

    One of the main things is knowing you've got an audience.

    Rest assured that you've got that part all sewn up. :)


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