3D Rendering Services



  • A project concern like house construction on finance over the mortgages these days are getting approved easily through 3D rendering designs where the same can be accomplished on 3D interior decoration placing objects with properties, and at last giving life form to a product depend upon 3D product rendering with removing all flaws, all these from 3D Team.



  • @'Nuke':

    It takes care of little sparkles (fireflies) that are inherent in photorealistic rendering systems.

    I'll try that out. Thanks!



  • It takes care of little sparkles (fireflies) that are inherent in photorealistic rendering systems.



  • @'Nuke':

    If the scene already has objects that would normally emit light (a lamp or ceiling fixture) and the "bulb" has its own material, select that material in the Editor tab and then go to the Preset tab. Expand the Shaders/Iray entry and select one of the Glass presets (I prefer the frosted glasses for light bulbs). Double-click to apply to the selected material.

    Go back to the Editor tab and you should see an Emission entry for the material. Set the color to something close to white, and the Luminance to around 1 million. Render and see how it looks. The default value of 1500 is way too weak, unless you're looking to light up one small area of a figure, like the face, and then the light has to be right on them, and it's still going to be dark.

    If it's an outdoor scene, create a new point light using the default settings and set its Z and Y translations to 500 each, then set the Luminance to somewhere around 30 million. For some scenes I've gone as high as 70 million to get a decent sunlight approximation. You may also want to increase the Z trans if it's too bright,

    Remember that your camera's headlamp will contribute light to the scene, and sometimes it may add too much. Also the camera controls like f-stop and film and shutter speed (in the Render/Editor tab under Tone Mapping) will affect the final render.

    Here's how my render/editor tab is generally set these days:

    General (pick your dimensions - mine are Full HD)
    -Auto Headlamp - I usually keep this set to Never, and turn my camera lamps off before rendering (or duplicate a camera and use that for setting up scenes with the headlamp On, then render with the other camera's headlamp set to Off)
    Render Mode (should be Photoreal)
    Progressive Rendering - everything here set to default except the Convergence Ratio is set to 100%
    Alpha I don't touch
    Optimization I don't touch
    Filtering:
    -Enable Firefly to remove speckles
    -Bloom Filter Enabled (On)
    –Radius = default
    --Threshold between 4000 and 7000, depending on the light intensity
    -everything else here default
    Tone Mapping:

    • (On)
      -Shutter Speed - anywhere from 400 to 1200, depending on how much light. Test render and if it's too bright, raise the shutter speed to 1200. If it's still too bright, lower your light's Luminance
      -F-Stop 5.6
      -Film Speed 400
      -everything else here default
      Environment - Scene Only (uses only light from objects in the scene, not the skydome or default sun)
      -everything else default here

    You've messed with a lot of the stuff I haven't even touched, LOL. I render scene only, the camera light just asses up the whole thing. You mention enable Firefly, what does that do in iRay? I assumed that was a Poser carryover.



  • If the scene already has objects that would normally emit light (a lamp or ceiling fixture) and the "bulb" has its own material, select that material in the Editor tab and then go to the Preset tab. Expand the Shaders/Iray entry and select one of the Glass presets (I prefer the frosted glasses for light bulbs). Double-click to apply to the selected material.

    Go back to the Editor tab and you should see an Emission entry for the material. Set the color to something close to white, and the Luminance to around 1 million. Render and see how it looks. The default value of 1500 is way too weak, unless you're looking to light up one small area of a figure, like the face, and then the light has to be right on them, and it's still going to be dark.

    If it's an outdoor scene, create a new point light using the default settings and set its Z and Y translations to 500 each, then set the Luminance to somewhere around 30 million. For some scenes I've gone as high as 70 million to get a decent sunlight approximation. You may also want to increase the Z trans if it's too bright,

    Remember that your camera's headlamp will contribute light to the scene, and sometimes it may add too much. Also the camera controls like f-stop and film and shutter speed (in the Render/Editor tab under Tone Mapping) will affect the final render.

    Here's how my render/editor tab is generally set these days:

    General (pick your dimensions - mine are Full HD)
    -Auto Headlamp - I usually keep this set to Never, and turn my camera lamps off before rendering (or duplicate a camera and use that for setting up scenes with the headlamp On, then render with the other camera's headlamp set to Off)
    Render Mode (should be Photoreal)
    Progressive Rendering - everything here set to default except the Convergence Ratio is set to 100%
    Alpha I don't touch
    Optimization I don't touch
    Filtering:
    -Enable Firefly to remove speckles
    -Bloom Filter Enabled (On)
    –Radius = default
    --Threshold between 4000 and 7000, depending on the light intensity
    -everything else here default
    Tone Mapping:

    • (On)
      -Shutter Speed - anywhere from 400 to 1200, depending on how much light. Test render and if it's too bright, raise the shutter speed to 1200. If it's still too bright, lower your light's Luminance
      -F-Stop 5.6
      -Film Speed 400
      -everything else here default
      Environment - Scene Only (uses only light from objects in the scene, not the skydome or default sun)
      -everything else default here


  • @'Nuke':

    The hardest part of DS is working the iray renderer.

    Lighting a scene correctly is giving me fits. It's second nature in Poser but DS is a different animal. I may just buy a couple of light sets and see how they're set up.



  • I think they planned the docs that way to foster a sense of community, where everyone who figured out how to work it shared their findings, and then move it onto a YouTube channel for the ad revenue.

    One thing I learned years ago with any software: click everything and see what it does, you can't break it and the only way to uninstall it is clearly marked. Although you can undo hours of work. And you can permanently disable the viewport in some programs, such that you have to reinstall it.

    The hardest part of DS is working the iray renderer.



  • @'SinCyprine':

    if you are on daz mostly for the g3 pussy, keep in mind that erogenesis is about to release his custom mesh that will most likely be poser only
    http://erogenesis.blogspot.fr/p/project-e.html

    i like daz, too bad the documentation is so sparse. seems they are trying to come up with their own video tutorials but its a little bit light atm.
    you can find more obscure daz knowledge thru Josh's channel - he is in daz team btw:
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtqhpxQyGa7fm0LPoDz4s4A

    I've been following Ero's progress very closely. I'm not abandoning Poser at all, just trying to branch out. And yes, Daz's documentation on how to use Studio is pretty weak. If I wasn't coming from a background in Poser I'd be totally lost. And it's supposed to be geared towards beginners…. :-/



  • if you are on daz mostly for the g3 pussy, keep in mind that erogenesis is about to release his custom mesh that will most likely be poser only
    http://erogenesis.blogspot.fr/p/project-e.html

    i like daz, too bad the documentation is so sparse. seems they are trying to come up with their own video tutorials but its a little bit light atm.
    you can find more obscure daz knowledge thru Josh's channel - he is in daz team btw:
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtqhpxQyGa7fm0LPoDz4s4A



  • @'Nuke':

    Poser vet here as well, and DS does take some getting used to, and it's a royal pain in the ass.
    I can help, a little.

    PM me if you need help. Tutorials can take a long time because there's so much that's different than Poser.

    Thanks Nuke. I'll keep you in mind. :)



  • Poser vet here as well, and DS does take some getting used to, and it's a royal pain in the ass.
    I can help, a little.

    PM me if you need help. Tutorials can take a long time because there's so much that's different than Poser.



  • Excellent. Thank you. :D



  • Hey broseph!

    I actually am a recent convert, I went from the PP2014 > Octane pipeline to DS > Iray. Started back in 2001 on Poser 3 (back of a magazine CDrom).

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L5FZ5gS9v50

    Honestly, the above video should walk you through most of your initial hardship.

    Keep in mind that DS has a headlamp (CTRL+L) so you can see shit, but should probably turn off for renders, unless you like the Blair Witch effect.

    -G!

    LINK TO VIDEO IF THAT EMBED ISNT WORKING https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L5FZ5gS9v50


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