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  • Botting. I think there was a spambot after my last post that got deleted, and that's what HZR was referring to. Been happening a lot lately.



  • If I can say anything about this subject as having been basically an amateur producer/director myself…

    @'Nuke':

    However, if the dialog is too deep, you may end up with more dialog scenes than action scenes, and if you try to run a conversation during the action, the reader may lose interest. There's only enough blood in the body to supply the brain or the genitals, not both at once, so making the reader process heavy dialog while they're trying to rub their nub is going to frustrate them.

    OP, this is precisely why you want to familiarize yourself with the term "Sotryboarding".

    One thing you'll notice right off the bat is how similar to a comic strip it is. Funny that: it's essentially that intermediate stage between writing your background story and your scripts, and shooting a film. So obviously another natural direction from the storyboarding phase is (of course) comics.

    The thing to keep in mind is only keep what is necessary to tell the story and convey to readers/viewing audiences. I tend to ramble when I write. Lots of things will get cut out. An unfortunate side effect is sometimes subsequent scenes may have unexplained changes from their preceding scenes. Why? Because you cut out a part or two (or more) which explains it –as was necessary to keep the story moving along. It's a balancing act. Obviously too much content and you get bogged down. Too little content and it's an incoherent, jumbled, hackneyed, bunch of scenes strung together vaguely connected to one another (if that).

    For example, I was high as fuck when I saw the movie Escaflowne for the first time. It seemed amazing and mesmerizing to me. (Yeah, shut the fuck up--you'll stare into the abyss and watch almost anything like flies on dog shit if you're high enough.) Then I watched again SOBER a couple years later. This was basically a bunch of parts from the whole entire anime series (which I had never watched) loosely strung together, plus some bonus scenes thrown in. Perfect example of why you don't just throw scenes together and call it a movie: Lack of context. Makes too little sense.

    Basically it was bullshit.

    And here, I just deleted two or three more paragraphs explaining other shit about it and my view about the movie because you probably don't care. See how I did that? :D

    @'hzr':

    ROFL - the botting is strong in this one

    Bottoming?! I have no idea of this bottoming–what is this bottoming you speak of?!

    !



  • ROFL - the botting is strong in this one



  • I would suggest reading erotic novels to get yourself into the mindset of how they're written. Read an even mix of the hardcore graphic-description styles and the "romance novels".

    However, I will also say I've never in my life read a Harlequin Romance novel (probably the best-selling series ever), and the only erotic novel I've ever read was one called Christina's Sins, waaaay back in the late 80s.

    If you feel the need to take a creative writing course, do so. Proper sentence structure is imperative when dealing with the written word, and the classic styles are classic for a reason (not so much the Biblical Thee and Thou and Ye, but "proper English").

    Then again, you might poke around and see what's selling these days. Markets change, and tastes along with them. While the Lady Chatterly's Lover films on Showtime and Cinemax were hits back in the day, their "lack of detail" may not fly with today's buyers.

    Ultimately, do what turns you on. It's more genuine that way, and that comes across in your Art. If you try to do something you don't care for, it won't be good, and those who know the difference will be able to tell. Even if you're not a prolific talent in a given field, but it moves you nonetheless, that alone can inspire you to write in that style, and those who appreciate that same style will connect with it and are more likely to forgive technical errors, as opposed to someone who just jumped on a passing bandwagon for a quick buck and threw something together.



  • @'Nuke':

    If you're trying to keep a stiffy while you work, setting up multiple scenes and different poses and angles detracts from that. If you've got limited-functionality scenery, like a room with only 3 walls, staying within those confines adds to the work aspect, and takes away some of the fun.

    Then again, keeping that balance, or putting the reader into a state of constant flux, may actually be appreciated by the more mature audiences, particularly those who read erotic novels where the only pictures are on the cover and in their mind.

    I love this, I totally agree.
    I know that this is a very hard skill to master but with time I guess it should get easier. I hope.



  • All my Aiko 3-based work used comic-style text boxes with narrative. Balloons fill up the window quickly, because you have to position them to show who's talking, and space them out to show dialog sequence. When that happens, you have to render more panes, and from different angles, and change the poses a bit to keep it from being "same scene, different angle" and convey a sense of continuity.

    However, if the dialog is too deep, you may end up with more dialog scenes than action scenes, and if you try to run a conversation during the action, the reader may lose interest. There's only enough blood in the body to supply the brain or the genitals, not both at once, so making the reader process heavy dialog while they're trying to rub their nub is going to frustrate them.

    If you're trying to keep a stiffy while you work, setting up multiple scenes and different poses and angles detracts from that. If you've got limited-functionality scenery, like a room with only 3 walls, staying within those confines adds to the work aspect, and takes away some of the fun.

    Then again, keeping that balance, or putting the reader into a state of constant flux, may actually be appreciated by the more mature audiences, particularly those who read erotic novels where the only pictures are on the cover and in their mind.



  • @'Nuke':

    Oohs and ahhs and grunts in callout balloons are usually just there because the author wanted it there, or couldn't think of anything else to put there. The viewer knows, or at least should have some idea, what sounds are made during sex. Others may wish to imagine their own sounds. Giving them "hints" in bubbles breaks it for them.

    If the scene isn't animated, then comic-style yellow-orange boxes with text explaining the graphic details will keep it from being just a rendered fuck scene, and won't be as cheesy as the noise balloons. "Mary slides her throbbing cock deeper into Jenny's tight, pink hole, moaning softly as Jenny's pussy quivers along her shaft. Jenny bites her lip and pants as Mary's rod grinds against her throbbing clit, and her knees shake as she struggles to hold herself up."

    That sorta thing in a text box is usually good enough.
    Granted you can see the action, or at least a still image of it, but the text helps to convey a sense of motion, and the viewer builds a frame-by-frame in their head.

    I agree with that view ;)



  • @'Nuke':

    Oohs and ahhs and grunts in callout balloons are usually just there because the author wanted it there, or couldn't think of anything else to put there. The viewer knows, or at least should have some idea, what sounds are made during sex. Others may wish to imagine their own sounds. Giving them "hints" in bubbles breaks it for them.

    If the scene isn't animated, then comic-style yellow-orange boxes with text explaining the graphic details will keep it from being just a rendered fuck scene, and won't be as cheesy as the noise balloons. "Mary slides her throbbing cock deeper into Jenny's tight, pink hole, moaning softly as Jenny's pussy quivers along her shaft. Jenny bites her lip and pants as Mary's rod grinds against her throbbing clit, and her knees shake as she struggles to hold herself up."

    That sorta thing in a text box is usually good enough.
    Granted you can see the action, or at least a still image of it, but the text helps to convey a sense of motion, and the viewer builds a frame-by-frame in their head.

    That sounds good.
    Thanks


    @'Gator762':

    Totally up to you - like you said, with sex narrative is largely unnecessary. I only added a few narratives, mostly when characters were cumming. My set is in the store under Gator3D.

    Disclaimer - I am a n00b at the comics myself, but will follow a style I like.

    Yea that's what I was thinking, thanks.



  • Oohs and ahhs and grunts in callout balloons are usually just there because the author wanted it there, or couldn't think of anything else to put there. The viewer knows, or at least should have some idea, what sounds are made during sex. Others may wish to imagine their own sounds. Giving them "hints" in bubbles breaks it for them.

    If the scene isn't animated, then comic-style yellow-orange boxes with text explaining the graphic details will keep it from being just a rendered fuck scene, and won't be as cheesy as the noise balloons. "Mary slides her throbbing cock deeper into Jenny's tight, pink hole, moaning softly as Jenny's pussy quivers along her shaft. Jenny bites her lip and pants as Mary's rod grinds against her throbbing clit, and her knees shake as she struggles to hold herself up."

    That sorta thing in a text box is usually good enough.
    Granted you can see the action, or at least a still image of it, but the text helps to convey a sense of motion, and the viewer builds a frame-by-frame in their head.



  • Totally up to you - like you said, with sex narrative is largely unnecessary. I only added a few narratives, mostly when characters were cumming. My set is in the store under Gator3D.

    Disclaimer - I am a n00b at the comics myself, but will follow a style I like.


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