SidneSande



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  • @'Redrobot':

    …that I was unprofessional and I would regret passing up this opportunity.

    I'd tell him that the word "Professional" only applies if he was paying me.

    I've always heard from every artist I know that they quickly learn to never do something for free.

    The only time I'd trust that exposure alone may be enough is if I know who they are off the top of my head with no trouble. …and I mean them personally. Not someone they claim to know.



  • The producer in '12 was the owner a small hollywood B-movie company similar to Asylum films. Guess you could say they were their main competitor. Even sharing a lot of the same actors in their productions. They had just released a couple of their monster/skin flix and were looking to expand. I had meet the producer in '10 and he recalled some of my ideas and wrote me to see if I was still writing. Actually got to meet a bunch of young and attractive actresses too that were working with him.
    As I said before nothing ever came of it. I however did learn a lot about writing a good screenplay which I use a lot in my comics today to give them a more cinematic feel.
    At least with this latest experience I only wasted a couple of hours doing some story boards and not whole months doing renders and modeling.



  • Oh? This wasn't your first time? Guess that explains your savvy on the issue. :)



  • I'm done working with any producer/director/wannabe writers. Unless they bring cash to the table than I'm not bothering to reply. Back in '12 I got the run around from another producer for a whole year regarding 4 screenplays that he said he was going to option from me. That sucked big time.



  • @'Redrobot':

    He was pretty new to whole 3DX scene and thought it was a good fit for his script project.

    <===SNIP===>

    He was wanting me to ask around and get people that would work for free, which was a big warning sign for me.

    Bingo. And if he didn't just throw you away, he'd come back later and want more of the same again.

    What bugged me the most was that it was going to be tremendously expensive and time consuming to do a full 100+ page multipanel comic book in 3D. Especially since the majority of the story took place in the 60's and 70's which would've made me have to hire other modelers to make era specific clothing, sets, furniture, and cars.

    As I've learned: even if you are going to spend lots of time and take cheap shortcuts, this only goes so far until you have to sink in some money.

    I've found that no matter what you choose, it ain't cheap and it ain't gonna be quick 'n' easy for just so many reasons, not the least of which are fine-tuning, postwork, and getting familiar with your toolset and learning your compromises (or what can't be). Personally I did invest in a couple of books, one on universal rendering and lighting; principles and techniques which apply to any 3D program, the other a book on comprehensive GIMP knowledge and how to get all you can out of it. I figure if I can build a foundation for my skill sets then I will "know what I'm doing" and mostly save a little money plus gain knowledge at the same time. Mats, shaders, lighting, subD. Textures and postwork. Stuff like that.

    So for some guy to just come in and start trying to get free work out of you AND other people is not only insulting, but it is for want of true appreciation to what it actually takes to put this kind of art together in the first place. A simple thing can have a disproportionate amount of hassle, time and cost in terms of stress.

    In his last email to me he basically went off saying how I had wasted 3 months of his time, that I was unprofessional and I would regret passing up this opportunity.

    My response would essentially be something like:

    "Yeah yeah, cuz we all know you have nothing better to do than talk shit all day about some insignificant guy and making sure he never works in hollywood again–to a bunch of egotistical chucklefucks whose asses I bet you're kissing and still don't even like you.

    Good DAY sir!"

    Nah, I think you'll be just fine.



  • He was pretty new to whole 3DX scene and thought it was a good fit for his script project. He had produced a very good 15mins short from it with some very recognizable actors. However that was in 2014 and it had seemed to have stalled him on in terms of getting funding for a feature length film. His last major production credit was way back in 2002 on his IMBD profile. I saw a few interviews with on on youtube with various media shows and podcasts so he had some knowledge about working in Hollywood.
    What bugged me the most was that it was going to be tremendously expensive and time consuming to do a full 100+ page multipanel comic book in 3D. Especially since the majority of the story took place in the 60's and 70's which would've made me have to hire other modelers to make era specific clothing, sets, furniture, and cars. He was wanting me to ask around and get people that would work for free, which was a big warning sign for me.
    I had storyboared out a part of the script that I thought would've been a good pitch, but it came out to 47 panels. All of which would've taken me some time to do, and again, for free. With the possibility of it getting picked up with the oh so many book publishers he said he knew. I just kept putting it off and off and he kept calling and asking about when he could see some work. We then narrowed that 47 panels down to 10, which I still was too much to do for free on a spec project which I had at that point had no interested in anymore. In his last email to me he basically went off saying how I had wasted 3 months of his time, that I was unprofessional and I would regret passing up this opportunity.



  • OP you're definitely not wrong, though I got into amateur productions from middle school up through high school and then a bit in college so I can sorta see where he's coming from in a couple ways. However, that open-ended promise is definitely 'unobtanium' that rarely materializes.

    He's likely a small timer who happens to have a few mucky-mucks in his corner, probably a shoe-in with an entertainment union and getting favorite treatment. Sounds like you're his intended means to an end until he can get someone better. Then he never heard of you all of a sudden. Yeah "that's show business" but it's also bullshit. Entertainment business is cut-throat and people behind the scenes aren't exactly known for being fair, honest, or ethical.

    If he were big time, he'd have someone like a mentor or at least a name to go with that bragging and back up his mouth. If he were up-and-coming, he'd have more to prove to the world and likely someone to oversee and keep an eye on the investment made by the backer.

    To this guy's credit he is very, very persistent which is a trait successful types tend to have more than actual talent. He is doing a smart thing in surrounding himself with talent.

    To understand a producer's mindset, a production's outcome is like so:
    If it fails, it's because of you; if it succeeds, it's in spite of you.
    Fact is a work will go over budget far more often than not (not unlike construction and/or automotive industries).

    I'd say if he really was up to snuff, he'd have a co-producer or a writing team. And again, names (agencies) to call upon.

    Good call, don't get screwed over–he'd probably take all the credit to promote himself.



  • Interesting… As a new guy to it trying to gain viewers I would be more likely to fall for it. Thanks for the info.


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