https://apnews.com/press-release/kisspr/lifestyle-weight-management-nutrition-medication-singapore-b1c671f9459cf29af923973f003ea571



  • Keto Premiere Reviews - Normally, our body draws on carbohydrates in our food (carbohydrates) for energy rather than pumping directly from fat. Worse than that for our extra pounds, our body will store fat as long as. Keto Premiere assists with exhausting fat veiling ceaselessly without signs. Spread no, general likely! Spirulina is a super food and a supplement rich cyanobacterium that has numerous properties. It is additionally a characteristic kelp that is stuffed with protein, making it a great cell reinforcement. Spirulina is an intense supplement loaded up with fundamental amino acids and iron, equipped for boosting the insusceptible framework, as per research distributed in the diary Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine. To get more info visit here: https://apnews.com/press-release/kisspr/lifestyle-weight-management-nutrition-medication-singapore-b1c671f9459cf29af923973f003ea571



  • Been seeing a lot of people who use LCPDFR in the multiplayer embedded into the game, and it looks like something that I wouldnt mind getting into as well as starting up more sound mods for IV, now that I really know how their engine system works.

    My question is: is it really worth investing the 5 in this? Id love to move away from the current pirated version i have, but if its gonna be a wasted lincoln on it, it wouldnt be worth my time.



  • @'gazukull':

    I wish I were a talented 2D artist. Like the Reiq, incase, Jornorin, calm, etc. I would do crazy ass comics without the limits of not being able to create your own assets (in my case).

    My parents were kind enough to send me to art school for 4 summers when I was young. You know what I learned? I learned that I had no talent and it was STEM all the way for me. Which I suppose worked out, as engineering treated me really well for a long time.

    Since I don't really paint on my images… I don't know. I feel like we need a new term for those who create 3DX... like 3DX Operator or I often say 3DXER to my wife... 3DX Practitioner. lol

    I'm sorta in that same boat. I'm technical minded and good with hands on mechanical and electrical but I'm no engineer. I've been back and forth on being artistic.

    Was kinda crappy. Mostly I did it unorthodox and by eye. Being left handed I'm fairly right brained. Got better at drawing for awhile but haven't done anything in several years now. Mostly just D&D illustrations but I got sick of only hearing criticism and shit talk.

    Did make one or two porn drawings I was proud of enough to not put through a shredder a few years ago when purging my life of paper and shit.

    I got these guides and they really helped. Concise, simple to read, understand, and use.

    http://www.amazon.com/Those-Bodacious-Comics-McLaughlin-2000-02-25/dp/B019TLLOKU
    http://www.amazon.com/Drawing-Cutting-Edge-Anatomy-Reference/dp/0823023982/ref=pd_sim_14_3?ie=UTF8&dpID=61oQDHnvTPL&dpSrc=sims&preST=AC_UL160_SR122%2C160&refRID=09MC94G0RV8T50EBCWFX
    http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/413627.Manga_Mania
    http://www.amazon.com/Manga-Mania-Occult-Horror-Characters/dp/B00EBFM7SI

    While it may be cookie cutter-ish to use guides, honestly you can't go wrong using familiar professional techniques if you're not "A gifted artist"™. I'd say learn orthodox of 2 general styles to start, then get around to playing with it and blending the two. Then you can really begin stylizing it to your personal liking.

    Since you use Zbrush, I know you gotta have a decent tablet at least for a high tech approach. Or you can go pencil and paper. Nearly all of these guides above recommend a high tech approach for coloring in, shading and lighting.

    Maybe also I'd recommend some books on shading techniques in drawing. Since you know 3D lighting pretty well I'd say you're already somewhat ahead of the curve on knowledge there.

    looks at my wacom bamboo tablet
    Maybe you could inspire me. :)

    The process isn't complicated. Once you decide on a scene:

    1. Dummy/skeleton for pose and width targets at joints and other body points. Start with simple and basic poses--this is critical when you first begin.

    2. Outline the basic overall shape for the base. A lot of fine tuning here but this is where I got really hung up on more difficult poses.

    3. Lines like a grid. This helps "align" features and pinpoint them at various points on the body. Lots more fine tuning.

    4. Clear base to prep for use. Once you've settled and made it "look right", erase all the lines and skeleton you drew to build it up--you don't need 'em anymore.

    5. Details of character. Face, body parts, hair, other things. Anatomy is a big one.

    6. Shading and coloring. This is an incremental process. If there is one thing I cannot emphasize enough about this is use colored pencils NOT markers (unless you get really good perhaps). Markers can saturate and I screwed up a few pictures I thought were gonna be okay.

    7. Render. Optional if using paper, but obviously required if making a webcomic. Here you tweak all the little things, saturate your colors, contrast, hues, shading and light, background, etc. You'll need a scanner at the very least if you do it on paper. Good mouse and/or decent drawing tablet.



  • I wish I were a talented 2D artist. Like the Reiq, incase, Jornorin, calm, etc. I would do crazy ass comics without the limits of not being able to create your own assets (in my case).

    My parents were kind enough to send me to art school for 4 summers when I was young. You know what I learned? I learned that I had no talent and it was STEM all the way for me. Which I suppose worked out, as engineering treated me really well for a long time.

    Since I don't really paint on my images… I don't know. I feel like we need a new term for those who create 3DX... like 3DX Operator or I often say 3DXER to my wife... 3DX Practitioner. lol



  • There's a guy who's using Pretty 3D's custom V4 character that she uses for ALL her promos. It's an identifiable character, and this guy uses it for his promos as well.

    However, this character was put up for sale just like any Daz character, so while it's perfectly legit that he does use this figure, at first glance, many people thought it was an advertisement for wares from Pretty3D.

    Personally I would have stipulated that the character could not be used for advertising of similar wares (clothes and such) just to avoid such confusion. 3DX would be fine, but your logo will have to be huge and more noticeable than the figure itself so people knew who it was not from, which in some cases is far more important than knowing who it is from.

    I bought about 2 dozen Gen2Fem characters from Daz last year, as well as the G2F morph packs to make my own. I try to mix each of the morphs for my renders so no one can readily identify a figure like Lilith or Mei Lin, but they still retain that "kinda looks like but not quite" aspect.
    Then there are the easily identifiable assets like hair and clothing, which really I can't do anything about.



  • BA has their thing, and that's their thing. 3D has enough inherent limitations, especially with ready-made figures, that it takes considerable effort to get yours to stand apart from everyone else's, but one of those limitations deals with the rendering aspect, which is quite possibly the most important. That's an artist's visual style (the very thing illustrative artists are identified by). Subtle nuances go largely unnoticed by the layman, so if two artists have a similar rendering setup (lighting and whatnot) but have no problem with each other and can easily tell each other's work apart, the average dick-beater out there will more often than not accuse one of copying the other, or credit one for the other's works.

    golf clap… I cannot agree more with Nuke. And to add, it's pretty effing easy for the average Joe to confuse one mans work from the other. Originality is key, even if it's an popular thing in 3DX.



  • @'Nuke':

    Agreed. 2D artists have it far easier than they realize when it comes to creating scenes. They're limited only by their ability as an illustrator and the media they work with. 3D has much more going on, a lot of which is out of the artist's control and has to be dealt with.

    Draw a 2D picture of Superman with his cape billowing in the wind, and then try to recreate that in 3D with ready-made items. It's not as easy as 2D, that's for sure. And yeah, 2D artists who bag on 3D do typically state "all the work's done for you" as their excuse. However, I've not seen one artist who grinds up plants for the pigments to make their own paint, pencils, pens, chalk, or other media, much less weave their own canvas. Same diff.

    Well, I wouldn't go so far to say that 2D artists have it easier. The their work relies on their own artistic talent. Those 2D artists that are crank out something good & quick are quite simply very talented. 3D, on the other hand, benefits from artistic talent, but I don't think it's necessary.

    I say that, as I see things for 3D such as posing & lighting as more technical skill than talent. You can buy all content, and not need artistic talent. For example, a newbie or someone that simply isn't very good probably has poorly lit scene & poorly posed characters making for a mediocre or poor render. Someone with good 3D technical skill can take the same content, light it well and pose well for a good or outstanding piece. And of course, a talented 3D artist can go further with their own content.

    But your point is spot-on about the work involved with 3D art and some of the work involved with some objects. :)



  • In 2D you have to really find your style if you want to stand out, this in addition to trying to come up with original content. The other thing is to really get the touch and feel down with all the finer points. Though I will say this: The modern day art has sort of hogged the limelight.

    Then you have traditional, classical art. The best 2D artist I ever knew of I also had the honor of knowing personally and going through high school with him. And even part of college. He did faithful reproductions of M.C. Escher and others. He has his own rough jagged style but a love for western and anime/manga.
    I could describe him any number of ways. A colorful guy in a sick world. Is he really mental or has this world disgusted him to the brink because he cannot simply leave? Philosophical query aside, he was highly inspired, motivated, and had a level of mental disturbance. His way of living and coping was art–he lived and breathed it. I'd never be able to compare to him and I don't intend on trying. He'd scoff at my using technology for art, I know him. But, I also know he would at least be interested where I intended to go, with my direction.

    @Nuke, I very much agree with you that many things are taken for granted. Animating motion for a 3D cape sounds boring in the abstract but people have no idea what work that entails. Look at 3D games like Star Wars KOTOR 1 & 2 and see that meelee animations between 2 characters still have alignment issues--turn the camera and you'll see 2 blades not touching among many other things. Shit, I don't even wanna think about 3d renditions of someone pulling clothing off mid motion.

    3D has a bit more learning curve but I wouldn't exactly say 2D is a breeze either.



  • Agreed. 2D artists have it far easier than they realize when it comes to creating scenes. They're limited only by their ability as an illustrator and the media they work with. 3D has much more going on, a lot of which is out of the artist's control and has to be dealt with.

    Draw a 2D picture of Superman with his cape billowing in the wind, and then try to recreate that in 3D with ready-made items. It's not as easy as 2D, that's for sure. And yeah, 2D artists who bag on 3D do typically state "all the work's done for you" as their excuse. However, I've not seen one artist who grinds up plants for the pigments to make their own paint, pencils, pens, chalk, or other media, much less weave their own canvas. Same diff.



  • Saying it's lazy is telling me there's jealousy in thinking it's all done for you by the artists who create the content.

    Which we all know is laughable, as we know anyone can buy some stuff from Daz or Rendo or wherever, fire up Daz Studio or Poser and render a scene. But there's still a big difference between good and bad renders. 3D requires a different sort of talent or technical proficiency.



  • Agreed. I'm not a 2D artist by any stretch of the imagination, but 3D lets me be the artist I want to be, because it's as if I've got a physical object with infinite possibilities for placement in a scene. It's basically a grown-ups version of the action figures and playsets I had as a kid.



  • i wonder who the hell cares about the opinion of some morons from some pirate community :D

    and that some oh-so-talented-crap 2d "artists" rant about it sounds simply like jealousy, nothing more. and just in case… i studied traditional painting on an university for years. its simply boring compared to the growing possibilities of 3d. and lets wait for 10 or 20 more years... 2d will still be 2d then :)



  • @'GumpOtaku':

    This is coupled with the presumed bias the E-H Galleries community has over 3DX that is is a lazy persons work.

    This has always been the big rub concerning 3D work, especially Poser/Daz stuff. For some reason most "traditional" artists think everything in 3D is already done for you, like Lego Star Wars playsets that will only snap together one way. They have no idea how much work goes into making a 3D model pose correctly realistically, or when the clothing item or hair you want on them doesn't have all the morphs it needs for the scene you want, and you have to do them yourself in the program or with external programs, which means learning those programs because no two are alike in their behavior.

    You give a college girl a few bucks and throw whatever WalMart lingerie on her and turn on a camera and everything's done. Cloth and hair move like it should on film. Furniture responds to weight all by itself. Liquids behave like they should in the real world by default.
    You don't get it that easy in 3D, even with the glut of ready-made stuff out there. Even 2D hand-drawn (digital or physical media) is easier because a good illustrator already understands the behavior of materials and can draw it doing what they want it to do. With 3D, a PhD in Physics directly pertaining to fabric, fluids, mass and density of materials, scene lighting, and cinematography/photography doesn't mean dick if you can't get those assets to work, and you either have to spend hours upon hours learning how to make a program do those things, be extremely gifted at getting it right by blind luck, or spend thousands on 3rd-party add-ons that do all that.

    Even if you did spend the money on add-ons that do "all the hard work" regarding the physics, there's still the basic concepts you have to deal with, including the rendering.

    As for the comment that started the thread: Basically I see it asking "Why aren't more people copying BlackAdder's work/style?"

    BA has their thing, and that's their thing. 3D has enough inherent limitations, especially with ready-made figures, that it takes considerable effort to get yours to stand apart from everyone else's, but one of those limitations deals with the rendering aspect, which is quite possibly the most important. That's an artist's visual style (the very thing illustrative artists are identified by). Subtle nuances go largely unnoticed by the layman, so if two artists have a similar rendering setup (lighting and whatnot) but have no problem with each other and can easily tell each other's work apart, the average dick-beater out there will more often than not accuse one of copying the other, or credit one for the other's works.

    This presents problems because most Artists are highly self-critical already, and hate to hear anyone say "your work is derivative of another's".

    To get beyond the comparisons, an artist may have to focus on a particular theme: goblins and elves, demons and humans, mythological creatures, derivative characters from other popular literary works, or video game characters, or movies, or comic books. Once an artist plants their flag on a given theme, it's generally accepted that other artists won't explore that theme, at least not with a public release.

    Hence, no one is copying Black Adder's works out of mutual respect.



  • Blackadder is the reason I got into 3dx :D

    edit: to keep it at least slightly ontopic: I wouldn't worry about the opinions of obviously uninformed dweeb.



  • @ dr3nchd

    Yeah Blackadder is like one of the few artists that I actually get their products!



  • @~ArgonCyanide777

    That is an excellent question! Truth be told I generally just do titles based on stories I want to do. BUT! Every other title is what I consider a crowd pleaser, something that was probably requested and the scenario fits into the story line.

    Most of the feedback I get tells me that people only want Jessenia content, usually involving as many dicks as possible. I feel if she was the only person getting action in the universe, it would be stale REAL soon.

    I did my dwarf female title because I really wanted to do it, but it was a commercial failure. I still finished the triology, just not expecting my usual sales… Lol.

    Also many of my titles are experiments in "Can I do this?". Anal Forge was an exercise in animating a gangbang. Anal forest was my first iray / DS title using tyranobuilder instead of renpy.



  • I'm just popping in here to let you all know that the comment that started this discussion is on one of the E-Hentai Galleries page featuring the work of Moiarte, a French 3DX artist known for 2 out of three: Interracial and Unrealistic Proportions. here is the gallery in question: http://g.e-hentai.org/g/906112/864be73a85/

    @Gaz - I am not disputing anything you have said. But the point on contention here is that the commenter is making the suggestion that ANY 3DX artist besides Blackadder is doing interracial, unrealistic proportions and futa because they're lazy. This is coupled with the presumed bias the E-H Galleries community has over 3DX that is is a lazy persons work.



  • @'gazukull':

    Let's be clear, Blackadder is one of the best 3DXers around and a pioneer in the field.

    Oh, without a doubt. I was just commenting on the "originality" comment. As far as technique, I'm pretty much in awe whenever I look at his stuff.



  • @ Gaz: Neither am I, I think it's just kinda freewheeling. You raise a good point about being self-stylized. From what I see you tend to like to do medieval sort of fantasy and monsters or I guess intraspecies. I can see you have a voracious appetite for anal judging by the gifs of your avatars. You're also involved in making 3DX games with that other guy. I may not explicitly look for your stuff as often as some, but I do recognize it when I see it.

    Hell, you even troll for levity and to ease tension. Or just for 'teh lulz' from time to time. Which I consider a plus.

    Do you have anything in mind for your audience or just play it by feedback? Or are you the sort that makes stuff and just don't give a fuck?



  • Let's be clear, Blackadder is one of the best 3DXers around and a pioneer in the field.

    That being said, a good majority of his content is unrealistic proportions, futa, and interracial (unless you mean IR in the porn sense).

    So… I am not entirely sure what the discussion is.


Log in to reply
 

Looks like your connection to NodeBB was lost, please wait while we try to reconnect.