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  • Working a bit more with this issue, I think I'm on the right track:

    Using DS/Iray and Stonemason's Contemporary Living setting and 2 figures, I had been placing Point Lights in the scene around 2 of the lamps, and kept getting grain in the shadows. I removed all the placed lights and set the light-objects (lamp bulbs and ceiling lights) to a frosted glass Iray material, which adds an Emmission channel. Set the emission color for the Bulb entries (3 lamps, one chandelier, and the ceiling lights) to a light grey, and kick the luminance up to about 70 million each, and crank the Shutter speed in the Tone Mapping page of the Render settings to about 3000, and I got a very realistic light falling on the scene.

    However, I'm also getting a double shadow which is mildly annoying, and haven't found a way to tweak their intensity that did not involve directly adjusting the light, which of course changes the entire dynamic.

    Also, increasing the render size to 3840 x 2160 helped, since downscaling would also make smaller noises even smaller. But, what I'm also seeing is bump mapping on the skin in the shaded areas, so it's a bit of both.

    Once I get the double-shadow corrected, and yet have the lighting I want, and get rid of the noise, I can go back and tweak the pose. I also need to look into weight-mapping the hair so it falls forward naturally, and applying deformers to the furniture, so couch cushions crush properly.

    I'd probably have all this done already if G2F was fully Poser-ready, and if Poser had Iray. Or if Daz Studio's deformation tools were as straightforward as Poser's.



  • I despise post-work. I'd rather spend that time setting up and rendering scenes, so I've been experimenting with the settings in DS/iray to get a "post-worked" appearance. Right now I'm having fun with the Bloom setting, and while I get the atmosphere I want, I'm getting visible grain in shaded areas that I don't want, so finding this thread was timely.

    I've tweaked the Convergence, and see if that fixes it. If not, I'll add more lights and brighten things up, then drop the overall Environment intensity. I've dropped it some already, which made it look not-so-much like broad daylight (indoor scene) and let the bloom of the interior lights really stand out.



  • I just wanted to add, I found the spot render tool saves a ton of time if the noise is only affecting a particularly dark area in your render. Try spot rendering the problematic area up to 40k passess or such with 100% divergence, print screen, paste in photoshop, align, layer, erase/heal brush, and presto!

    Spot render is also really cool for simulating "wet" effects for certain areas of skin by cranking specular glossiness/strength on that surface, spot rendering the area you want to appear wet, and then blending the layers in photoshop.



  • So, setting the convergence to 100% works :D Thank you Nothingmore :)



  • I feel lazy if I haven't opened a render in Photoshop—no matter how good the initial render is, it can probably be made better with a bit of 'shop work. With my Sydney images, I always need to do a fix for her glasses, since the hair prop pokes through the frame. There are often other little fixes for poke-through, etc. Then there's toning—correcting lighting, helping in shadows. Sometimes I'll add blur based on a depth pass (although that's only when I'm wavering on whether I want it before I render). I might color correct parts if I don't like them. Finally, I might paint elements that I couldn't render—moisture on skin, small hair fixes, or sometimes just texture.



  • @'nothingmore':

    The only way I've been able to eliminate most of the noise is by setting convergence to 100% (by default it's 95%), and running through more passes; sometimes up to 20k and rarely less than 10k. You also need to lift your render time cap from 7200 seconds (2 hours) to however long your rig might take to fulfill that requirements. I let them run over night (28800 seconds/8 hours), and if there are any stray speckles left when I wake up they can be cleaned up in photoshop without too much hassle.

    That 5% convergence error lets your renders show "100%" completion, but that's 100% of 95%. That 5% error shows up as luminance noise, which is less perceptible in well lit areas, but becomes very visible in dimly lit areas (like shooting high ISO on a dslr in well lit vs. low lit scenarios). Unfortunately each percentage takes longer than the last, exponentially, so the only way for now to eliminate most of the low light/shadow noise in Iray is to add more light or strap yourself in for some super long render times..

    ..and prepare for your power bill to spike a little bit.

    Thank you all for your knowledge :) I will try first Nothingmore's method, and if it's still doesn't work, I will try to put more light in my scenes, and do some modification in Photoshop (something I didn't want to do at the first place ^^;).

    Speaking about Photoshop, how many of you are using Photoshop (or another software) on their renders, and mostly for doing what? :)

    Thank you again.



  • hehe, I am doing animations, so 10 minute renders are already way too long :D So you can imagine I am trying to optimize where I can.



  • The only way I've been able to eliminate most of the noise is by setting convergence to 100% (by default it's 95%), and running through more passes; sometimes up to 20k and rarely less than 10k. You also need to lift your render time cap from 7200 seconds (2 hours) to however long your rig might take to fulfill that requirements. I let them run over night (28800 seconds/8 hours), and if there are any stray speckles left when I wake up they can be cleaned up in photoshop without too much hassle.

    That 5% convergence error lets your renders show "100%" completion, but that's 100% of 95%. That 5% error shows up as luminance noise, which is less perceptible in well lit areas, but becomes very visible in dimly lit areas (like shooting high ISO on a dslr in well lit vs. low lit scenarios). Unfortunately each percentage takes longer than the last, exponentially, so the only way for now to eliminate most of the low light/shadow noise in Iray is to add more light or strap yourself in for some super long render times..

    ..and prepare for your power bill to spike a little bit.



  • Here's Paul's blog. He's the guy that develops the Octane Plug-In for Poser and he mentions the basic problems with it. Worth a read.

    http://poserphysics.blogspot.com.au/2014/11/my-octane-faq.html



  • I am using octane, I tried the high light / low exposure and it does help somewhat. I did a very rudimentary approach where I multiplied all lights' intensity by 10 and then divided the exposure roughly by 10. Still not perfect but I got rid of some noise basicaly for free, so can't complain :D



  • I think the only solution to that noise is more light. I haven't experimented with it much, but I've considered rendering out with much more light than I want, then reducing the exposure in post-production (e.g., Photoshop). That way everything gets enough light to render without noise, and I still get the exposure I want. But for that, you need to go into the Advanced tab of the Render window and set up a canvas (the default one is fine). That gives you a 32-bit .exr file that you can change the exposure on without getting horrible results. Even if you render with the render window, the .exr file will be in a folder wherever you save the regular render.



  • @'SinCyprine':

    i dont use iray so i wont know the specific but here are some common pointers:

    • looks like the skin of the middle girl has a light emiter, try to fiddle the values (distribution, intensity, priority…)
    • bring more light to your scene, quoting TRRazor on octane forum:

    Try to light the room REALLY brightly and very evenly, don't leave a single spot unlit.

    Then, use the exposure to achieve the light mood you want in the room. (By lowering the value you'll get darker moods, by setting it higher, you'll get brighter moods.).

    I come from a photography background - the method described above is the same movie sets are lit - try it, you'll see, it works and it will get rid of that nasty specular noise

    (you can read the rest of the thread even if you dont use octane: https://render.otoy.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=44&t=51766 )

    This is really interesting, does this work just for hotpixels? I am having some issues with noise in darker areas, it looks like no matter how long I let the render run it disappears very very slowly after certain point



  • i dont use iray so i wont know the specific but here are some common pointers:

    • looks like the skin of the middle girl has a light emiter, try to fiddle the values (distribution, intensity, priority…)
    • bring more light to your scene, quoting TRRazor on octane forum:

    Try to light the room REALLY brightly and very evenly, don't leave a single spot unlit.

    Then, use the exposure to achieve the light mood you want in the room. (By lowering the value you'll get darker moods, by setting it higher, you'll get brighter moods.).

    I come from a photography background - the method described above is the same movie sets are lit - try it, you'll see, it works and it will get rid of that nasty specular noise

    (you can read the rest of the thread even if you dont use octane: https://render.otoy.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=44&t=51766 )


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