Top Business School in Hyderabad



  • IMT Hyderabad is one of the best MBA institutes in Hyderabad offering the best management course as per industry standards. We are offering the best platform for grooming future professionals and industry experts.IMT Hyderabad is among the top business schools in Hyderabad.IMT closely in terms of having international guest lecturers, placement programs and providing state-of-the-art infrastructure. 98% of students are placed with INR 8 LPA package. Their course structure is aligned with international standards, they have excellent industry relationships for placement & there are a number of good development programs, taken by external experts, for the development of the students.



  • Mac is not a computer system…it's a religion.
    I'm a professional graphic artist that's worked in a large firm for decades and we started with mostly Macs. Over the years we bought more and more PCs due to the price despite the fact that the Macs where more reliable. The PCs however, on a cost to cost basis where more powerful. The reliability of Windows improved over the years and we learned a LOT about them out of necessity making us much more knowledgeable users.
    Windows7 64 bit has erased the one final Mac advantage...reliability. It just runs. I can have Photoshop, After effects, Premier Pro and a few other support programs going at once and it just chunks along. In two years I have yet to crash or lock-up Win7.



  • I never have a MAC, I always used a pc… it's more, I've only seen a mac when I was doing a graphic design course jejeje, in my country those machines are very expen$$$$$ive u_u



  • I grew up on a mac…and I remember the old Apple II computers at school. Hell I's one of the first in my grade to beat Oregon Trail. Now people are like "Huh"?

    Used my mac performa 6300CD from mid 90's on up to about 2004. Only reason it isn't still being used is the graphics card is shot and, well, a 1995 mac doesn't have any readily available replacement parts...I can't be sure how to access the hard drive any other way...

    In 2004 I got a Sony Vaio laptop...That lasted until about 2007... 2008 I got the machine I have now eMachins T5274. Not sure if memory leak or just decrepit.

    I feel obsolete...



  • @'scorcher64':

    As for hardware, I was using a brand name PC up until 1999, when I learned about custom PCs and got into building them .The flexibility of being able to choose whatever part you want to put inside without the limitations of the manufacturer's proprietary hardware configurations set for you made me love PCs even more. People complain about PC longevity between upgrades, but there's the common misconception/exaggeration that people feel they need to upgrade their PCs every few months or couple of years. Those are just hardcore gamers and benchmark enthusiasts that do that. I haven't touched mine in 3 years and I have yet to utilize 100% of my GPU or CPU. Additionally, when it comes to parts failing such as the power supply or motherboard, since the parts are universal I can just change that one particular part from a local shop down the street for pennies on the dollar, compared to paying an arm and a leg to a manufacturer for the same part.

    This. ^^

    When I was a kid my dad had one of those old Macs that have the monitor built into the tower. I loved that thing, spending hours in MacPaint. I wanted one for myself and couldn't imagine anything else. In high school a friend had an Amiga, and I was floored by the graphics capabilities. So I wanted one of those. At the time I was working part time trying to get a car, so the luxury of any computer was far beyond my meager income. If I wanted something like that, my dad said, save your money and buy one.

    Eventually I did, and ironically it was because I wanted to use Poser. An old roommate had P4 installed on his computer back in 2000, and my filthy little mind immediately realized that this little program could make PORN!! At that point I started shopping for a PC that could run it. My roommate realized what I was doing and put a quick stop to that, since he had been building his own PC's for years and knew that I could get far better machinery doing it that way. And honestly I never looked at Macs. I knew that they were insanely expensive compared to PC's, and I soon learned that building one was pretty restrictive because I had to use Apple hardware.

    I've been running homebuilt PC's for over a decade and I can't see that ever changing, for the reasons scorcher stated above. Not only that, I'd have to start over completely not just with the Poser program, but with over a decade's worth of runtime content. I have no ill will towards Apple users or the product, but I can say for sure that most people that I know who use Macs don't use their computers for what I use mine for.



  • Kind of vague OP. Best I can tell you is "It depends".

    Where you want a slick, hassle free, multimedia, general use, simple-to-use computer, Apple.

    Oh wait…or if you live in hollyweird and you want to use "the standard" in video editing (Final Cut Pro), also Apple.

    For everything else, PC. Period. Though I am in no way deluded about microsoft. It's a piece of garbage.



  • PC

    Mainly because Apple have no direct presence here.

    The so called hardware advantage of IBM/Intel PCs is actually also its biggest weakness. Look at how many legacy/old hardware standards are still alive today - PS/2, COM, LPT. Before PCI Express, PCs have too much expansion slots standards - PCI 33 MHz, PCI 66 MHz, VESA local bus, ISA, Enhanced ISA. Standards that were pretty much shared between 'ecosystems' like SCSI and MIDI, were sub par implementations. There's no guarantee plugging in a SCSI scanner will work with a SCSI storage adapter for hard drives and MO drives. MIDI generally works, but latency is way higher than it should.

    Hardware quality is atrocious in the later 80s/early 90s, when they started selling PC components as DIY kits. The moniker Plug 'n Pray stemmed from the fact there's no guarantee that a component will work without manually adjusting IRQ and hardware memory address. Not to mention, small OEMs will use the cheapest alternative unless you request a certain spec. Intead of EDO-RAM, you'll get FPM RAM. Instead of 2 identical memory SIMMs, you get mixed SIMMs, often with different memory timings. On the other side, ODMs and big OEMs will charge an arm and a leg for certified components. Sometimes, they even tinker with standard components so you have to use theirs instead of buying replacement parts elsewhere.

    As for software, although Windows 95 may have been the most successful Windows in respect on how it changes the whole PC industry (Plug 'n Play, USB, multimedia API support with DirectX and TCP/IP support), it was no true multitasking OS and runs on top of DOS. Microsoft did the right thing and put that 'thing' to pasture with Windows XP. Sure, real hardware requirements were much higher but memory management is safer - most GPFs and BSOD are generally hardware related than software caused.

    Software for Windows is a proprietary ecosystem, which can be roughly translated as a closed one. If you want proof just try migrating to a different platform. Although the hardware is the same, suddenly you can't do stuff you can do before. Such a system do have advantages though. For instance, the graphics industry wouldn't come this far without MS 'managing' DirectX to its current state. OpenGL is still playing catchup (that includes OpenGL ES).

    I use a Windows PC because there is no alternative. And no, emulation/virtualization is still nowhere close to a native implementation.

    "Every PC is a Macintosh" - Steve Wozniak



  • This conversation is essentially about the operating system you run, considering the underlying hardware is all the same these days. Just that some of the OS's mentioned make it harder to install on different configs than others.



  • @'Alpensepp':

    "ls -a" is not a simple command? (well you can get fancy with ls -a | grep "^." )
    and it's a Finder option as well.

    command line 2op4me



  • @'Alpensepp':

    "ls -a" is not a simple command? (well you can get fancy with ls -a | grep "^." )
    and it's a Finder option as well.

    There's still a lot of people who like to believe that OS X is not running on a Unix core, that it has NO command line functionality anywhere within it, therefore it must be inferior to whatever they're currently using which has those features. Doesn't make them right, but they sure love to believe it. ;)



  • PC = Windows PC, no?

    … Ubuntu...

    Still: Windows is just as closed as MacOS... the AppStore is as STORE... never seen a store where anyone can sell anything, of course it's closed... and it's not like you have to install stuff through the AppStore, never did except XCode
    MacPros do have PCIe slots, don't they?
    Since market share seems to improve the software issue is less and less of a problem... won't matter in 10 years, since all you'll get is web interfaces anyway.

    Well... as long as no one claims UX is better on Windows PCs...

    @'korezaan':

    simple command to show all hidden folders.

    "ls -a" is not a simple command? (well you can get fancy with ls -a | grep "^." )
    and it's a Finder option as well.



  • PC

    Nearly out of the same reasons Miro mentioned.
    And one additonal, the price. I've compared sometimes what I would get for the money I have and usually got a lot more in a PC than in a Mac, so I bought the PC.^^


  • administrators

    PC

    not a fan of closed systems as you get fed what you should eat :)
    more flexibility and range software and hardware wise with PCs



  • I prefer PCs. 50% of my reason is software. 50% hardware.

    I'm an ex-Mac user (1994-1996, MacOS 7.5), turned into a PC user (1997-present) and never looked back. I swapped because I became annoyed from the lack of native Mac software or overall ample Mac software support for the things I use the computer for. I never considered myself an "average" user. I do more than just web browsing, social networking, word processing, and audio & video entertainment. About 90% of my software have the "PC-CD/PC-DVD" logo on the packaging with no hint of a Mac counterpart under a different name.

    As for hardware, I was using a brand name PC up until 1999, when I learned about custom PCs and got into building them .The flexibility of being able to choose whatever part you want to put inside without the limitations of the manufacturer's proprietary hardware configurations set for you made me love PCs even more. People complain about PC longevity between upgrades, but there's the common misconception/exaggeration that people feel they need to upgrade their PCs every few months or couple of years. Those are just hardcore gamers and benchmark enthusiasts that do that. I haven't touched mine in 3 years and I have yet to utilize 100% of my GPU or CPU. Additionally, when it comes to parts failing such as the power supply or motherboard, since the parts are universal I can just change that one particular part from a local shop down the street for pennies on the dollar, compared to paying an arm and a leg to a manufacturer for the same part.

    Since I haven't used a Mac since '96, I cannot say anything about ease of use or OS stability of the current version of MacOS. The Mac has come a long way from when I used to use it. When it swapped to the x86 architecture, getting one again crossed my mind, hoping it would get more software. It did to an extent, but not much for the software I care for. I can always use boot camp and dual boot Windows, but I can only see myself using it as just another Windows machine because I have nothing that I need a Mac for… that and there's still my hardware reason.



  • PC.

    I don't know if PCs break or fail more often, but I can figure things out and I feel like I have better control over things. Right clicks, CTRL+ALT+DEL, BIOS on startup, even the registry; many more things are simply available to me with a simple command to show all hidden folders. In a Mac I can't do that, or at the very least it's been more difficult. The design philosophy in the user interface is like the design philosophy for their visual aesthetic: unibody everything and hide all the mechanics.

    Could be demographics, but I haven't heard of troubleshooting on Mac as anything more complicated than the on/off button and uninstalling/reinstalling. Then again perhaps those things actually just do solve all the problems, but conceptually it offends me. It's like working a math problem and erasing everything rather than just starting a new line. Or sending the car to the shop/dealer every time there's the slightest problem.



  • Mac. As far as the "hardware limitations" go, I personally prefer owning a computer that just works and doesn't exist to hassle me or waste my time. Also given my preference to own a computer for something on the order of 5+ years before replacing it (because by then it'll be obsolete even with upgrades simply thanks to Moore's Law), there's a certain … symmetry ... that I can achieve on my Mac where it ultimately winds up costing me less than $2 per day over the course of my ownership of the machine, which is actually pretty darn good all things considered.

    I run Boot Camp with Windows 7 on a partition for the sole purpose of playing online PC (only) games. I don't even surf the net on the PC side of my computer, simply because doing that is "safer" on the Mac side of my machine (relatively speaking) ... plus I've got a Time Capsule to backup my Mac data, so I'm far better "protected" in OS X than I am in Windows 7 for reasons of logistics that go beyond just the OS flavor.



  • PC. Mostly due to the hardware limitations under Apple's ecosystem. Final cut pro would be nice, but not worth the hassles inherent with that ecosystem.


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